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When the Tebowing Gets Tough …

If you Google “Tim Tebow” these days, what you find is story after story after story of teams making it very clear that they have no interest in him.

“We’re really happy with the two quarterbacks we have,” San Diego GM Tom Telesco told NFL.com.

“We feel really good about (our backup) Kyle Orton,” Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones implausibly told the Dallas Morning News.

“No. … totally untrue,” a high-ranking Dolphins official told writer Armando Salguero, who tweeted that he had simply asked, “Tim Tebow?”

In Cincinnati, my friend Paul Daugherty was called a f——- idiot (or some such)* for simply suggesting that it might not be totally nuts for the Bengals to possibly, maybe think about considering the option of perhaps looking into Tebow. Warren Moon jumped in to say Tebow can’t play in the CFL. The Jacksonville Jaguars — the freaking JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — who are terrible, who are utterly nondescript, who have been putting tarps in the upper deck (except when Tebow comes), who are desperately trying to rebrand themselves while people keep talking about the team moving to Los Angeles … even the Jaguars do not want Tim Tebow.

*I have now seen the NSFW tweet— the guy did not call Daugherty an idiot, but did ask what the f— was wrong with him.

“The Jacksonville Jaguars’s plans do not include Tim Tebow,” a team spokesman wrote to the Florida Times Union.

Heck, the Montreal Alouettes GM Jim Popp, who has exclusive CFL negotiating rights to Tebow, offered what has to be the most tepid recruiting quote I think I’ve ever heard. “He would be coming to Montreal to be a backup player … to learn the game and, maybe, in the future, he’ll be able to compete for a starting job,” Popp told the Montreal Gazette.

I don’t know — all of it feels like people protesting way, way, way too much.

Look, it doesn’t take a genius to notice that Tebow is kind of inaccurate throwing footballs and he has a long throwing motion that makes his release cartoonishly slow. It also doesn’t take a genius to know that he’s still 25, he’s won a Heisman Trophy, he has started 14 games in the NFL — most of those in a playoff run, and most of them victories — and that there is a lot to like about him. He’s tough. He’s committed. He’s fast. He seems a good teammate.

But he has something else — a gift or a curse or both — and it is this: Everyone has a STRONG opinion about him. And to make it double the fun, it’s not the same opinion. Think how rare that is for a football player? Does everyone have a strong opinion about Aaron Rodgers? Matt Ryan? Joe Flacco? Cam Newton? Could you fill up any number of hours of talk radio and TV argument time talking about them? No. Not unless you brought Tim Tebow into the conversation (then you will get the very strong opinion that those quarterbacks are BETTER than Tebow).

Tebow must live with being fascinating to people … or violently NOT fascinating to people. Certainly no player in memory has inspired more “I don’t care about …” comments than Tim Tebow.

This knack for inspiring strong feelings has marked Tim Tebow’s entire pro career. Should he really have been a first-round NFL pick? No. Not the way he throws the ball. He should have been a fifth- or seventh-round pick, like the project he so clearly was. But he’s Tim Tebow, and people can’t help but be fascinated by him and so the Broncos took him in the first round — with all the expectation and money that comes with that pick.

Should Tebow have been the Broncos starting quarterback in only his second year? Probably not. But that team had a very good defense, and Jerry Jones’ favorite Kyle Orton was leading the Broncos to a lot of losing, And also Tebow is fascinating to people. Then, improbably, Tebow and the team — for whatever reason — had a nice finish and earned an unlikely playoff spot. Then the Broncos got Peyton Manning.

Should the Jets have traded for Tebow? Of course not. That made no sense from the second it happened, But, one more time, Tebow is fascinating to people. Maybe the Jets wanted to win the battle for the tabloid backpages (mission accomplished!). Maybe they wanted to bring out the best of Mark Sanchez (mission failed miserably!). Whatever they wanted, you would have thought after making the trade that they would actually have wanted Tebow to SUCCEED in some form, but they basically treated him with disdain, did not build anything that fed his talents, and it was a fiasco.

Then the Jets released Tebow, and it was big news because … he’s Tim Tebow.

Every step, people have not seen Tebow. They have seen the phenomenon, not the player. They have seen the best-selling author and pitchman, not the man. They have seen the controversy and the inspiration, not the quarterback. Maybe it just had to be that way because of Tebow’s biography.

Still, this latest reaction seems a shame. Here you have terrible teams like the Jaguars and rich owners who haven’t won squat in two decades like Jerry Jones trying to score cheap points by publicly saying they don’t want Tebow. Why does he deserve that? Has he been a bust like, say, Jamarcus Russell or Ryan Leaf? No. Has he been a bad guy? No. Has he been a terrible teammate? No.

Seems to me he’s just been a great guy to root for and root against, an honest and religious guy who seems to have been pretty respectful to those who disagree, a hard-working guy who has taken way too many shots and been given way too much praise and has not seemed to let that change him. I wasn’t a Tim Tebow fan coming out of college — I did not think he could throw well enough. I still don’t know if Tim Tebow could be a productive quarterback in the NFL. But watching all these football people falling over themselves to kick him while he’s down, I find myself hoping he proves them all wrong.

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37 Responses to When the Tebowing Gets Tough …

  1. Alex says:

    Can we stop pretending Tebow didn’t bring some of the hate on himself? He puts himself out there for mockery exactly as Chad Johnson, Terrell Owens, or any other attention-seeking athlete does. As Tommy Craggs wrote back in 2011: “Whenever Tim Tebow takes a knee on the field and thanks God, he is engaging in a very conscious act of moral grandstanding. I write that with no judgment whatsoever. Tebow is saying, “Look at me,” just as surely as Deion Sanders doing the pigeon wing in the end zone was saying, “Look at me.” He is saying, “Look at me and gaze upon my prayerfulness,” and he is saying that because he is an evangelical Christian, and evangelical Christianity is a religion built on conspicuous faith. He is bearing witness, right there on the hashmarks. He is spiking the Gospel.” He’s earned this.

    • Chris says:

      How does putting yourself out there equal earning hate?

      Jason Collins just put himself out there in a very difficult way, and he is publicly praised (not saying he shouldn’t be). But, those who mock or ‘hate’ Jason Collins are looked down upon. Would you still say that he brought that hate on himself? That he earned it?

      Tebow puts himself out there. I do not believe that deserves hate.

    • Joe says:

      Evangelical Christianity is a faith built on knowing God and Jesus. It’s anything but conspicuous faith, done right it has nothing to do w/religion, and Tommy Craggs is apparently clueless about what it’s like to base your life on walking with God. Or he has an axe to grind.

    • tomemos says:

      Joe, are you saying Tebow’s faith is not conspicuous? If so we have different views on conspicuous…ness. Conspicuity.

    • Joe says:

      I’m not saying there is no conspicuityousness to Tim Tebow’s faith. My intent was to point out the fallacy of Craggs’ description of Christianity.

    • “How does putting yourself out there equal earning hate?”

      What if he gave the crowd the finger once a game? He’s doing that to everyone who doesn’t share his religion or if they do then he’s doing it to everyone who is embarassed to lack his religious fervor. And then there’s the whole praying-on-streetcorners thing his religion supposes he’s not to do.

      “done right it has nothing to do w/religion”

      Uh…not nothing. Maybe it’s an independent part of religion and can be separated from all the other features of religion, but you can’t believe in God and Jesus and say it’s nothing at all to do with religion. Pretty sure that’s the polar opposite of nothing to do with religion. And in this case, it’s a billboard in a stadium of tens of thousands of onlookers and on camera where millions can see it. As I suggest above, it’s like advertising your church to anyone who might want to join, while giving the finger to everyone who wouldn’t want to join. Craggs may be wrong about what true evangelicals would believe, but given the history of evangelicals in the past hundred years (they pretty much invented mass-market televised church) he can be forgiven for his mistake. Especially, one would hope, by the Christians.

    • Joe says:

      Believing in God and Jesus has everything to do with relationship and nothing to do with religion. If you will recall, Jesus most ardent opponents were the religious institutions of the day.

    • macomeau says:

      Christian historian David Bebbington says: “Although ‘evangelical’, with a lower-case initial, is occasionally used to mean ‘of the gospel’, the term ‘Evangelical’, with a capital letter, is applied to any aspect of the movement beginning in the 1730s.” He notes four distinctive aspects of Evangelical faith: conversionism, biblicism, crucicentrism, and activism, noting, “Together they form a quadrilateral of priorities that is the basis of Evangelicalism.”

      And:

      Activism describes the tendency towards the active expression and sharing of the gospel in diverse ways, that includes preaching and social action.

      Craggs wasn’t describing Christianity in general, but the specific brand that Tebow practices: Evangelicalism. He even says that several times in the sentences quoted. His only mistake might have been not using a capital ‘E’.

    • You have GOT to be kidding. So now, expressing your faith – not by criticizing anyone, but simply affirming what you yourself believe – is “putting yourself out there” in some negative way?

      You know, before Obama, every U.S. President at one time “put himself out there” like that. Have things changed so utterly, so quickly?

      What have we become?

  2. Zach says:

    Tim Tebow’s problem is that he’s become a symbolic figure to a lot of different kinds of people, none of whom react well to being told they’re wrong. To evangelical Christians, he’s a model 20-something male (and this is a mantle he takes on willingly, witness his anti-abortion Super Bowl ad). To the segment of sports fans who believe that if a team wins it has to be because the quarterback willed them to victory (especially if it’s a comeback win, even if his terrible play led to them being behind in the first place), he’s the living incarnation of Hawk Harrelson’s TWTW (The Will To Win).

    The rest of us see a guy with somewhat extreme religious views and no real ability to play quarterback at the NFL level, yet a guy who was talked about to a nauseating degree from his time in college to now. Even when it’s clear that he has little to no future in the NFL, he keeps getting talked about. Is that his fault? Not really. Does that make me like him any more? Not really.

    • Zach says:

      To elaborate: certain people who were invested in the “Tim Tebow, Quarterbacking Legend” story for religious or other reasons refused to hear any evidence that, you know, he wasn’t any good. When the Broncos rode that strong defense and a bunch of luck to some wins, that became conclusive proof that he had some ineffable ability to transcend (a word I’ve chosen intentionally) statistics, scouting, and the judgement of just about everyone who followed the NFL even a little bit. Those people insisted that Tebow was different, that he could defy the numbers and the odds, and they’re the ones who created the myth that he had any place starting at quarterback in the NFL.

      Take that away, and you’re left with a not particularly fast or strong (in the context of the NFL) athlete with no discernible position, a high salary, and legions of fans who will insist that he play all of the time, even if he stinks. It’s not hard for me to see where the backlash has come from, even if Tebow’s role in it is mostly secondary.

  3. Joe – I live in Kansas City, take The Star, have followed and loved your writing. You are, in my humble opinion, the best sports writer in America. So you already know what what’s coming, right? I agree with Chad. I am sick to death with the “Hey, dig me” and “I’m oppressed because I’m a Christian” stuff. There was even a political cartoon in the Op-Ed page of The Star today about it. And it’s nonsense. I have been to about 100 NFL games, most at Arrowhead or Soldier Field, and watched many hundreds on TV in my 53 years. I can’t recall the last one where there wasn’t some overt display of a player’s Christian faith. I’m a Christian, a former deacon and elder and congregational moderator in my church. I have ZERO problem with his faith. But there’s a reason a player gets punted by two teams in two years, and nobody wants him. If he could really significantly help any team win, he’d have a job. All kinds of crazies have jobs. Because they’re good. He’s not.

  4. The Cardinals would take him. Town’s full of people who’d dig the Tebowing, and team wouldn’t be any the worse with yet another clipboard holder. Heck, he wouldn’t even need to take the field before the game-ending bow. Just stand outside the ballyard greeting fans like Bob Feller. In this market he’d kill at that. That’d get people out on Thursdays. I’d hate every last second of it, but I can see it being approved by the people who run the organization. Kind of surprised they didn’t snag him before the Jets did. His performance is a non-issue to them (unless they suddenly woke up and claimed amnesia about their last N tries at getting a winning QB; even Kurt Warner was a sentimental last-stop-before-the-glue-factory pickup, until lightning struck). So it’s still a highly plausible stop for him. Unless they’ve already made a public show of saying no and I haven’t seen it.

  5. KHAZAD says:

    I don’t really see NFL people “falling all over themselves to kick him while he’s down.”

    I see a whole bunch of media people asking questions to NFL people about Tebow instead of something else actually happening with their team and a bunch of NFL people that are tired of addressing it.

    Led by ESPN and talk radio, this is an entirely self created story by the media, and now you are part of it’s perpetuation. ESPN spent a lot of time prior to that draft talking endlessly about Tebow, and the Broncos contributed to it by making him a first round draft pick.

    Tebow, both before and after the draft, made it worse by saying he only wanted to be a QB, instead of trying to adapt his skills to a new role (ala Brad Smith). He also showed little interest in quelling (media driven) QB controversy in either place he played. He overvalued himself by deciding the Jaguars were not a suitable team for him a couple of years ago. Spurned once, they now have no interest. If I remember my Christianity correctly, pride is one of the seven deadly sins.

    Now the media, possibly seeing a story they have fed on for multiple years disappearing, bring Tebow up at press conferences that have nothing to do with him and lazily posting Tebow non stories on their websites.

    The beginning of this article may as well have started “When you google Tim Tebow these days, what you find is story after story of the media trying desperately to create a story or blog entry about Tebow” And now you can add this one to the list.

    • tomemos says:

      Totally right. Joe says at the end, “he’s just been a great guy to root for and root against.” But if you can’t say he’s good at football and you can’t say he’s a bad guy, what’s the basis for either of those? Isn’t that tantamount to saying, “he’s famous for being famous”?

  6. Joe, love your writing.

    Tebow is talked about too much. But, honestly, the goal of football owners is to make money. I don’t understand what the Jaguars are doing. Here are their QB choices:

    Comp Yds/G Td/Int QB Rating
    Quarterback A 59.1% 200 .9 74.9
    Quarterback B 53.8% 155 1.2 70.2
    Quarterback C 47.9% 143 1.9 75.3

    Clearly, the options are terrible. Quarterback C can’t throw: his only saving grace is the absence of turnovers. Quarterback B is no better, with 6% better completion percentage and 12 more ypg coming at a much higher interception rate. Quarterback A looks serviceable next to the others, but still would’ve been roughly the 25th best quarterback last year.

    Jacksonville cannot win with any of these guys starting, but, they CAN make significantly more money with Tebow, much much more than they are making now. If all their options end with the 2014 lottery, why not lose games with Tebow? He would make them money while they lost their way to a real quarterback; they could then bench him as soon as they had a franchise caliber starter (instead of gabbert or henne).

    • KHAZAD says:

      Tebow had the chance to go to Jacksonville when the original trade happened last year. The Jags offered slightly more money and the same round draft pick. (with a higher slot) After neither team would declare him the starter, Tebow told the Broncos he preferred not to go the Jaguars and that he felt more comfortable with the Jets.

      The Jags’ owner then said that it worked out for the best because if he didn’t want to be there and wasn’t committed to the team, they didn’t want him either. Tebow is not in Jacksonville by his own choice. His head was too big a year ago and now he has to live with the consequences.

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  8. djangoz says:

    “Every step, people have not seen Tebow. They have seen the phenomenon, not the player.”

    I have to disagree with this, Joe. I think that GMs are now seeing him as the player he is. A 3rd string QB (maybe) in the NFL. Some team will probably pick him up, but there is no mad scramble to do so.

    He is not awful or without redeeming qualities, but he is not particularly well suited to play QB. That’s Tim Tebow.

  9. Jeff says:

    What’s fascinating is that it’s reached a point where what Tim Tebow does or doesn’t do no longer matters. People have made up their minds about him, and nothing is going to change their minds.

  10. olderholden says:

    The comments here provide a snapshot of the Tebow Matter. He is a righteous combination of straight-up admirable jock, a humble Christian, a self-righteous low-consciousness advocate of Christian evangelical life, a tight end who wants to be a linebacker, a great teammate, a media circus center ring distraction, and more.

    Tebow challenges boundaries of privacy, belief, and worship by being himself publicly.

    I admire him, he annoys the daylights out of me, I wish him well, and I look forward to his life after football.

    • clashfan says:

      I disagree that he’s a humble Christian. His publicly demonstrative prayer shrieks “Look at me! I’m praying and it’s awesome!”

      It’s also against the Bible’s teachings.

  11. Let’s compare Tim Tebow to someone he has a LOT in common with. I can think of another guy who, like Tim Tebow:

    1) Was quarterback of the Florida Gators
    2) Won the Heisman Trophy
    3) Led the Gators to a national championship
    4) Was a devout, outspoken evangelical Christian
    5) Lacked the throwing arm that NFL teams usually want in a starting QB

    The man I’m thinking of, of course, is Danny Wuerffel.

    Now, despite all of Danny Wuerffel’s undeniable accomplishments on the field and all his fine personal qualities, did ANY team draft him in the first round? No- he was taken in the 4th round, right about where he belonged (and right about where Tim Tebow belonged).

    And when the New Orleans Saints drafted him, did even the most passionate Gator fans or the most ardent evangelical Christians start buying his jersey or calling for him to be the Saints’ starting quarterback? No! Even devout Christians who loved the Gators didn’t like Wuerffel’s chances of succeeding in the NFL.

    Conversely, did atheists and non-Christians start “I HATE DANNY WUEFFEL” web sites, or write snarky message board posts slamming him as a Bible-thumping hypocrite? No! Even people who had little or no respect for Wuerffel’s faith didn’t get angry enough to attack him. They were content to let him succeed or fail on the field.

    In short, both Billy Graham fans and Richard Dawkins fans were sane and logical enough to see Danny Wuerffel (who was EVERY bit as successful as Tebow in college and who was EVERY bit as vocal a Christian) for exactly what he was: a great guy and a great college QB who probably didn’t have what it takes to succeed in the NFL.

    I’ll never understand why people can’t be as calm or as coolly logical in evaluating Tebow.

  12. Claire says:

    I’m certainly not going to say that Tebow LOOKS like an NFL quarterback. He doesn’t. And yet…he hasn’t exactly failed yet.

    Tebow: career passer rating of 75.3; plus, in a typical start, about 60 rushing yards and a TD.

    Kyle Orton: career passer rating 79.7; plus about 3 rushing yards per start and a rushing TD every other year.

    Not much difference in value there, although neither set of numbers is anything like Peyton Manning’s. What is unusual, as Joe rightly indicates, is the polarisation on Tebow. Most years there are two or three first-round draft picks who do nothing, don’t make the playoffs, and quietly slip away after a few years. Tebow’s already ahead of them, with one playoff win. And yet these other players draw little media attention, and rightly so.

    What is depressing is that if you read a professional writer who has decided to write a negative piece about Tebow, then you immediately know the writer’s political viewpoint: you know it’s someone who pretends to be liberal but who hates people who are different from him. Can’t we all just get along?

  13. Rich says:

    Tim Tebow is not a lightning rod. Christianity and its role in popular culture is.

    If any good has come from Tebow’s “religious grandstanding” it is this:

    By publicly professing his faith on a grand stage, Tebow has turned a spotlight on the role of Christianity in American pop culture. Kudos to him, and to our great country that we can openly discuss and wrestle with these issues without fear of violence or imprisonment .

  14. Alejo says:

    The ‘knee on the ground’ thing was only ever a marketing trick. Personally, I dislike and mistrust people who self-publicize.

    • Bob Post says:

      So you dislike just about any professional athlete that has accomplished anything in the last 30 years. My first memory of a “self-publicizing” athlete was Mark Gastineau after a sack. That opened a floodgate of football players that came up with a celebration after every sack (See Neil Smith’s baseball bat swing). Then there was a scheduled dance-off after every touchdown. Now it’s become trendy for every pass caught over 10 yards comes with a “first-down” signal from the receiver. And every tackle, even if it’s after a 4-yard gain, comes with a “look at me” pose. Now, even defensive backs that happen to be in the area of an incomplete pass act like they saved the Super Bowl.

      Baseball players don’t seem as bad, though there are definitely exceptions. Reggie Jackson was as big a grandstander as I’ve ever seen. Pete Rose bouncing the ball off the turf after the third out in Philly (near the end of his career), and notably, Barry Bonds, standing at home plate watching the ball leave teh park. Guess you don’t like any of those guys either.

      How about basketball. Well, don’t get me started. Let’s just say that every shot doesn’t need smack talk.

      So that leaves soccer. Wait, every single soccer goal I’ve ever seen ends with a player diving on the turf or ripping off his shirt or pretending to be an airplane.

      So I guess you’re a hockey fan?

    • Bob Post says:

      So you dislike just about any professional athlete that has accomplished anything in the last 30 years. My first memory of a “self-publicizing” athlete was Mark Gastineau after a sack. That opened a floodgate of football players that came up with a celebration after every sack (See Neil Smith’s baseball bat swing). Then there was a scheduled dance-off after every touchdown. Now it’s become trendy for every pass caught over 10 yards comes with a “first-down” signal from the receiver. And every tackle, even if it’s after a 4-yard gain, comes with a “look at me” pose. Now, even defensive backs that happen to be in the area of an incomplete pass act like they saved the Super Bowl.

      Baseball players don’t seem as bad, though there are definitely exceptions. Reggie Jackson was as big a grandstander as I’ve ever seen. Pete Rose bouncing the ball off the turf after the third out in Philly (near the end of his career), and notably, Barry Bonds, standing at home plate watching the ball leave teh park. Guess you don’t like any of those guys either.

      How about basketball. Well, don’t get me started. Let’s just say that every shot doesn’t need smack talk.

      So that leaves soccer. Wait, every single soccer goal I’ve ever seen ends with a player diving on the turf or ripping off his shirt or pretending to be an airplane.

      So I guess you’re a hockey fan?

    • clashfan says:

      Bob, at least those guys are honest about their enthusiasm. They know they’re being showboats. Tebow violates Matthew and Luke with his public displays.

    • Alejo says:

      Yeah, football really is about empty bragging. But in baseball there are still some stand-up guys. I haven’t seen Jeter doing weird gestures, or Evan Longoria… but you are right, some guys celebrate a strikeout like their 300th win or something. Pathetic.

  15. ” Here you have terrible teams like the Jaguars and rich owners who haven’t won squat in two decades like Jerry Jones trying to score cheap points by publicly saying they don’t want Tebow.”

    Huh?

    Joe, I think you missed the mark here. It’s not like the owners are calling press conferences to announce they don’t want the guy. They’re getting asked a question. Assuming they don’t want him, they have two basic choices for a response:

    1. A strong denial of interest.
    2. A mealy-mouthed non-committal answer, ostensibly to spare Tebow’s feelings.

    The problem with #2 from the owners’ perspective is that it results in a barrage of stories ala “Team X open to Tebow” & “Quarterback controversy in city X” meaning more questions and more stories.

    Better to just nip it in the bud.

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  18. LargeBill says:

    Joe, As to people calling Paul Daugherty an idiot, maybe they were just thinking back to his sanctimonious and inconsistent rationale for his Hall of Fame ballot. He’s a hack.

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  20. Oh wow, that’s the least self-aware quote I’ve ever read. I wouldn’t be surprised if there were a quote from that very same day advocating the opposite for a cop.
    Fuck man, these assholes think this party’ll never end, but the longer it goes the worse it’s gonna be.

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